Pride (Proper 17C)

Jeremiah 2:4-13
In verse 5, God asks what wrong did the Israelites find in God that they drifted away. To be clear, God asked where God had failed, which led the Israelites to walk away. So we’re going to look at this two ways. First, do you think God can fail? Set a timer for 5 or 10 minutes and keep your hand moving while responding to the question. You may find it helpful to write “Can God fail?” a few times until your brain loosens up. You might find yourself asking why you believe as you do.
Second, ask how or when has God failed you. Write on this for 5 or 10 minutes. Were you tempted to walk away? Did you walk away?

Psalm 81:1, 10-16
This is an unusual psalm because it’s written from “God’s” perspective as God gives up on the Israelites. Similar to the Jeremiah passage, you’re going to freewrite for 5 or 10 minutes on the question “Does God give up on us?”

Hebrews 13:1-8, 15-16
Print out the passage and then slowly read it a few times underlining phrases that stick out to you. Spend a little time with each phrase until you fix on two to three words. Then transfer the phrase that sticks out to you most on a piece of paper. From here you can collage in pictures that relate to the phrase or doodle around the words. Add your thoughts on the words.

Luke 14:1, 7-14
There are two keys to this passage. The most obvious is not to assume honors but to let others raise you to a place of honor. After all, it’s less embarrassing to remain where you are or be raised up than it is to be told you’ve assumed you are more important than you are.
The second is about who you spend your time with or who you exchange gifts with. We’ve all heard “birds of a feather flock together,” which indicates we like our companions to be like us. Take out a sheet of paper and draw a table with people that you would have at a banquet. Then add in people who should be present.

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Categories: Ordinary Time/Propers, Year C | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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